New Arrivals: Fresh Flowering Tropicals

It’s getting hot out there! Create your own backyard oasis with a taste of the tropics. Flowering mandevilla, hibiscus and bougainvillea are ready to adorn your patio in our beautiful ceramic pottery! Did you know? Our tropicals are Fresh From Florida!

Video Look: What’s In Store June 6, 2020

June is here and it feels like summer! We’ve received fresh flowering mandevilla and hibiscus to make your patio feel like a tropical oasis! Pair with our beautiful ceramic glazed pottery! Hydrangeas are in bud and bloom, perennials are arriving weekly and our roses look fantastic! Stop in to see all that’s new!

Protect Against Ticks & Mosquitoes

‘Tis the season for ticks and mosquitoes. With all of us spending more time in at home this season, protecting against ticks and mosquitoes is front of mind. At Mahoney’s, we carry a variety of products to repel those annoying pests, safeguarding you and your family so your time in the yard is as pleasant and peaceful as possible. Here are some of our favorites:

 

Everguard Tick & Mosquito Eco-Friendly Pest Control: Designed to safely repel ticks and mosquitoes. Attach a hose and spray around leaf litter, around shrubs, under decks, shaded areas and lawns. Contains citronella, lemongrass, cedarwood, thyme, cinnamon and garlic oils.

Bonide Mosquito-Beater Granules: Made with natural ingredients. Effectively repels for up to 3 weeks. Non-toxic, bio-degradable and pleasantly scented. Easy to use shaker for application. Enjoy mosquito-free surroundings any place, anytime!

Bonide Mosquito-Beater Ready-to-spray: Kills and repels mosquitoes, flies, and gnats. 1qt protects 5000SF. Simply attach to garden hose and apply. Low order, water-based permethrin.

Daminix Tick Tubes: Did you know that ticks get lyme disease from mice, not deer? Damminix Tick Tubes rely on the natural nesting instincts of mice to take the battle to source and deliver tick-controlling permethrin directly to this host animal and the ticks it effects.

 

 

 

A MUST READ: Watering Wisdom

With the lack of rain this season, our gardens (especially newly-planted shrubs, trees and perennials) can be at risk without proper watering. Here’s what you need to know:

When we talk about the importance of newly planted trees and shrubs becoming “established” in the garden, we are referring to the development of a healthy root system. This root system is the basis for the plant’s top growth and long term health. And water is the key ingredient in developing that root system.  For the first two years of its life in your garden, the tree and its roots are particularly sensitive to water deficits. As the tree matures, its roots reach deeper into the ground and are able to tap water sources there. 

New shrubs and trees will require supplemental watering throughout the first growing season, right up to the onset of winter, and again in the second growing season. Water needs to be applied in the form of a gentle and deep soaking, down to the bottom and around the entire circumference of the root ball. Importantly, plants will require this watering at least once a week, and oftentimes twice a week in order to prevent any part of the root system from drying out.  

How much water a plant needs depends on its size. A small shrub will need 2-3 gallons of water each time it is watered. A larger shrub, 3-5 gallons. A small tree will need 5-8 gallons.  Mid-sized and larger trees, correspondingly more.   

 

Water can be delivered in several different ways: 

  • A garden hose turned on at a slow trickle and set near the base of the tree or shrub should be moved around the tree so that the circumference is equally watered.  
  • If you enjoy the peace and quiet of the garden, holding a watering wand attached to the end of a hose is a pleasant and effective way to water plant material. Allow the water to form a large puddle under the first tree or shrub. Move to a second tree or shrub and form a puddle there. As you are working with the second tree or shrub, the first puddle will be soaking into the soil. Move back and forth between these trees and shrubs 3 or 4 times to ensure a deep soaking.  
  • Soaker hoses can be placed around the base of trees and shrubs in concentric circles to cover the root mass circumference, or wound in a serpentine pattern up and down a row of newly planted trees and shrubs. They can be set on a timer and left to run for several hours depending on the size of the plant material. 
  • Traditional sprinkler systems are intended for watering lawns or beds with annuals and perennials. They are not the best way to water new trees and shrubs because they do not allow for sufficiently deep watering. It is recommended that you supplement with any of the methods described above. It is worth noting that systems are available that utilize special drip lines and emitters that allow for longer watering cycles. 

 

Two watering strategies that will not serve your plants well: 

  • Watering frequently but lightly does not benefit the tree or shrub as it encourages root development at the surface, making the roots particularly vulnerable to drying out in times of water deficit.  
  • Keeping a plant in soaking wet conditions day after day will deplete the oxygen in the soil, not a good thing for any life form! Hence the need for deep watering followed by a period in which the soil is allowed to dry out.  

Even as night time temperatures cool and the grass is moist with dew in the morning, it is important to keep up your program of supplemental watering.  Scientific data indicates that plants need one inch of rainfall per week throughout their lifetime. While we can hope for a soaking rain every week, it is not something we can rely on, so it falls to us to be good stewards of our landscapes. 

Special: Hummingbird Feeder $17.50

Stop in to our birding sections to see our hummingbird products, including our special feeders available in clear and red, with easy-to-access feeding ports that will provide plenty of nectar to keep your hummingbirds coming back for more!

reg. $24.99, valid while supplies last. Sorry, not available in Osterville.

Now In Bud & Bloom: Peonies

It’s a great time to load up on perennial peonies! The Spring favorite is in bud and bloom in our perennial yards now. This season, we’re carrying an incredible selection of varieties to adorn your garden. We have tried and true favorites as well has hard to find varieties, you’ll want to collect them all!

Peonies are garden classics and have been growing in Eastern gardens for 4,000 years. It was used as the Imperial symbol in China and slowly migrated to Japan around the 8th century. Ancient Greek mythology highly regarded the peony for its medicinal purposes, as did the Christians in Europe during the Middle Ages.

Peony derives its name from a Greek myth. Paeon, a student of Aesculapis (God of Medicine), was well aware of the medicinal qualities of peony plants. He used them to heal a wound suffered by the god Pluto which so infuriated Aesculapis he threatened to kill Paeon. Pluto saved Paeons life by turning him into a peony. Another myth replaces Pluto with Zeus.

There are a few myths about peonies and my favorite is about the “nymph” named Paeonia. She was so beautiful that she attracted the attention of Apollo. This did not sit well with Aphrodite, she was so jealous she turned Paeonia into a flower.

There are 3 classifications for peonies, herbaceous, tree and intersectional. All are hardy to zone 3, drought tolerant, deer resistant and low maintenance. There are many varieties to choose from and can be used in the landscape as a specimen, mass planted as a hedge, or in a container on the patio. They do not like to be planted to deep and will last for years with minimal care.

HERBACEOUS – These are the ones that die back to the ground every year. They will grow 3 to 4 feet high and wide and have lush, glossy, green foliage. The flowers come in a range of colors from shades of red, pink, purple and white. Blooms range in size and fullness, from single petal to fully double blooms. Japanese varieties have 1 to 2 layers of petals that surround a cluster of partially formed petals in the center (petaloid stamens). There are many that are fragrant, from a mild scent to a heavy fragrance.

TREE – This variety has a woody stem that stays throughout the winter. Tree peonies can grow 5 feet tall or more but are slow growers. So, it is quite possible your plant will remain small for several years. The flowers are larger than herbaceous peonies and the color range is red, pink, coral, yellow, and purple to bi-colors. Some are fragrant but not as much as herbaceous. They will thrive in dappled shade with only 4 to 5 hours of sun and bloom 2 weeks earlier than herbaceous ones. Although they lose their leaves in winter the woody stems maintain a graceful structure for the season.

INTERSECTIONAL – Also know as ITOH peonies originated by crossing a tree with a herbaceous peony. This was done by Japanese botanist Dr. Tochi Itoh in 1948. Sadly Dr. Itoh died before the seedlings were able to flower. It was up to his family to continue and nurture them until they finally bloomed in 1964. An American botanist, Louis Smirnow, was finally able to get permission to bring some plants to the USA where he patented 4 hybrids and named them ITOH hybrids.

ITOH’S grow up to 3 feet tall and wide. The lush finely divided leaves grow close to the ground giving it an elegant mounded look throughout the season. The have enormous flowers with fluffy petals that surround a cluster of yellow stamens. ITOH’S come in a range of colors including red, apricot, coral, pink and yellow. Just as herbaceous peonies start to fade the ITOH’S burst on to the stage, extending the peony season another 2 to 3 weeks. It is similar to herbaceous as it dies back for the winter and the flowers are large like the tree peonies.

There is a peony for every garden, whether it is used as a specimen, hedge, container or just added to the perennial border. Place fragrant varieties close to home where their scent can be enjoyed. Float a flower in a bowl, cut a bouquet and enjoy these beauties for years to come.

Spotlight: Downy Mildew Resistant Impatiens

Fill your gardens with bright, long-lasting color. NEW Beacon Impatiens offers high resistance to downy mildew for healthy gardens all season. You can rely on Beacon to thrive. Available in 6 colors, you can fill baskets, window boxes, and shade landscapes with confidence.

Uncle Mike’s Herbs & Veggies Arriving Weekly!

Our stores are loading up with our very own, locally-grown edibles! Grown in our Woburn, MA greenhouses, our Uncle Mike’s line of herbs, veggies and strawberries are made up of the best performing varieties for New England gardens. Stop in to see cool weather crops, tasty herbs and even a few warm – weather crops like tomatoes! New plants arriving weekly!

Now In: Summer Flowering Bulbs

PLANT NOW FOR SUMMER ENJOYMENT

Summer is arguably the most satisfying time of year for the gardener. Gone are the worries of an impending frost. Departed are spring’s gray skies and torrential downpours. Sunshine is plentiful, the soil is warm and everything wants to grow, grow, grow! And, this year, more than ever, bulbs are sure to be the shining star of the summer garden.

Typically, when bulbs are mentioned, many conjure up visions of spring blooming types like tulips, daffodils and hyacinths. There is, however, an amazing list of summer bloomers that provide an unmatched range of color, form and texture in the landscape, right at the height of the growing season. These beauties bloom all summer long and into the warmth of early autumn.

Most summer flowering bulbs (rhizomes, tubers, corms) are spring planted, after the last frost in our New England climate. There are a couple exceptions like Alliums, which are planted in the fall, and Hybrid Lilies, planted in either the fall or spring. Also, many but not all, summer bulbs are tender. Tender bulbs should either be dug immediately before or after the first frost and stored for the winter, or you may simply replace the following year. With a number of these bulbs being so affordable, they lend themselves to be purchased and planted anew each season.
Here are some of our favorites:
BEGONIAS Tuberous begonias add color to the shadier areas of the garden. Available in both cascading and upright forms, these beauties look fantastic in hanging baskets and in just about any type of container. Make certain, however, that your container is well drained. Begonias like their soil moist but not wet. It can take up to three months for tuberous begonias to bloom after planting.

CALADIUM Another shade loving plant, Caladium is grown primarily for its colorful foliage. Caladiums make a bright, unique and stunning addition to darker sections of the garden with their mottled, heart shaped leaves in green, pink, red and white.

DAHLIAS What can we say about Dahlias? Dahlias are the superstar of the summer garden and they never fail to steal the show. Available in oh-so-many sizes, bloom types and colors, the choice is nearly limitless. If we could grow just one type of summer flowering bulb, it would be Dahlia. Plant tubers in warm soil after all danger of frost has passed. Shorter varieties may be grown in pots. These brilliant beauties will bloom their magnificent heads off until hit with a heavy frost after which the tubers are dug and stored for the winter. Dahlias are, by far, the most diversified and colorful cut flower for summer bouquets. Check out the Dinner Plate series— with GIANT blooms that are sure to impress!

LILIES Hybrid Lilies are winter hardy and may be planted in the spring too. Some are highly fragrant and all varieties make excellent cut flowers!