Special: Mosaic Bistro Set $199.50

reg. $249.99

Available in 4 distinct styles, our bistro sets are the perfect addition to any space- indoors or out! Makes the perfect gift for Mom! Crafted of durable powder-coated iron and ceramic tiles, choose the style that works for you. Set includes 1 table and 2 chairs. 

Now in bud and bloom: Lilacs

The fragrance of lilac is often associated with feelings of “home” or other pleasant memories. We seem able to remember the fragrance even decades later. The clusters of fragrant flowers that adorn the lilac bush in mid to late spring mean that summer is just around the corner.  

Lilac is easily grown in well-drained soil. It will bloom its best in full sun conditions. Choose a location that allows for good air circulation to minimize the potential for mildew on the leaves. Prompt removal of faded flower panicles will help increase the bloom count for the following year. This is also the best time to prune to control the size of the plant, if that is necessary. Pruning is best done by the first week in July. After this time, the plant will be setting next year’s flower buds and pruning will sacrifice next year’s flower show. 

Planting a lilac near the house means that the heady fragrance can waft through open windows. Planted as a hedge, they make an effective, not to mention fragrant, screen. As part of a mixed border planting, they mix beautifully with roses and peonies.  

As a cut flower, they are a delight. Fill a vase with cool water. Using a sharp pair of hand pruners, cut when the lilac panicle (the entire cluster of flowers) is one-quarter to one-half open. Use your pruners to split the stem a couple of inches up the center to allow the stem to take up water. It is not necessary to crush the stem. Crushing the stem will not help the lilac take up water.   

 

Syringa meyeri Palabin 

Also known as Dwarf Korean Lilac, ‘Palabin’ is smaller, denser and more rounded in its habit than traditional lilacs. It typically grows 4’-5’ feet tall and 5’-7’ wide, making it suitable for small gardens. It has very fragrant purple flowers. They are arranged in 4” clusters that are perfectly scaled to the shrub. This variety is particularly resistant to powdery mildew.  

Syringa patula ‘Miss Kim’ 

‘Miss Kim’ is a compact, upright variety which grows 4’-7′ tall with a similar spread. It has deep purple buds that open to reveal clusters of 3” long, highly fragrant, lavender blue flowers. The flowers bloom slightly later than other lilacs, extending that heavenly season of lilac fragrance. Leaves are very resistant to powdery mildew. They are burgundy tinged in the fall, adding to this shrub’s appeal.  

Syringa reticulata ‘Ivory Silk’ (Chinese tree lilac) 

Syringa vulgaris ‘Ivory Silk’ is a small tree or large shrub which grows 20’ tall with a rounded crown.  It has beautiful 12” long, creamy white, fragrant flowers with a captivating fragrance. Blooming later than most other species of lilac, its beautiful show takes place in late May and into the summer.  Its beauty is enhanced by rich green foliage and attractive reddish brown bark. ‘Ivory Silk’ is lovely as a specimen tree in the landscape. It can also be used in the mixed border.  

Syringa vulgaris ‘Charles Joly’ 

Hybridized by the famous French plantsman, Victor Lemoine, in 1896, ‘Charles Joly’ has deep reddish-purple, double flowers that are extremely fragrant. Heart shaped green leaves on upright branches contribute to this handsome shrub. It matures to a height of 10’-12’. An outstanding variety, it was given the Royal Horticultural Society’s Award of Garden Merit.  

Syringa vulgaris ‘Krasavitsa Moscovy’ 

Perhaps the name of this shrub merits some explanation. Syringa is Latin for lilac and vulgaris is the Latin word meaning “of the common people, commonplace, shared by all”. So this is where the familiar term ‘common lilac’ comes from.  The variety name, ‘Krasavitsa Moscovy’ translates from the Russian to ‘Beauty of Moscow’ or ‘Pride of Moscow’ and refers to the fact it was hybridized in Russia. It dates to 1943. 

A beautiful and very fragrant variety, it has pale pink buds that open to form double white florets, blushed pink at the edges. The flowers are up to 9” long. It is stunning in full bloom. It matures over time to 8’-12’ tall by 6’-7’ wide. Like all common lilacs, it can be pruned immediately after flowering to contain its size.  

Syringa vulgaris ‘Ludwig Spaeth’ 

Lilac ‘French Ludwig Spaeth’

‘Ludwig Spaeth’ offers a display of beautiful, heavily fragrant, dark purple blooms that open from elegant violet flower buds. The flower clusters are up to 12” long. The foliage is bluish-green in color and heart shaped. Useful in the mixed border or in mass plantings, it will grow 8’-10’ in height and 6’-8’ in width.  

Syringa vulgaris ‘Madame Lemoine’ 

‘Madame Lemoine’ is an heirloom French lilac that has dense panicles of marvelously fragrant, double white flowers that open from creamy-white buds. The foliage is heart shaped in form and medium green in color. It grows up to 15’ in height and 12’ in width. This variety was hybridized by the famed French horticulturalist, Victor Lemoine, and named for his wife.  

Syringa vulgaris ‘Monge’ 

Lilac ‘Monge’

Another of Victor Lemoine’s introductions, ‘Monge’ has a depth of color that is striking. The flowers are deep reddish purple and richly fragrant. The flower panicles are up to 9” long and produced in abundance. It’s a dramatic and beautiful sight in the garden. A few branches cut for the house will fill the room with an enchanting fragrance. ‘Monge’ typically matures over time to a height of 8’-12’ and a similar width.  

Syringa vulgaris ’Sensation’ 

‘Sensation’ is unusual in that its flowers are bi-colored. The clusters of blooms are composed of individual purple flowers, each edged in white. They are sweetly fragrant. The effect is charming. Rich green foliage is held on upright branches. In time it reaches a height of 10’-12’ and a width of 6’. ‘Sensation’ will be a sensation in your garden.  

 

Reblooming Lilacs 

In recent years plant breeders have developed lilacs with the ability to rebloom. After the first flush of springtime bloom, these lilacs take a rest in the heat of summer before flowering again later in the summer and into the fall. The second bloom cycle is not as heavy as the first, but it is still showy. Pruning immediately after the spring bloom will create a fuller shrub with more branches and encourage more flowers. These lilacs display good mildew resistance. Their compact size allows them to fit into smaller landscapes and they make a nice addition to perennial beds, mixed borders and foundation plantings.  The Bloomerang series have large and fragrant flower clusters displayed on a dense and branching shrub which is perfectly sized for the small garden. 

Syringa x ‘Bloomerang Purple’ 

Clusters of lilac purple, sweetly scented flowers cover the branches in spring and continue off and on until frost. It grows 4’-5’ in height and width, making it suitable for small spaces. It is a nice addition to the mixed border and can be used to create a fragrant, low hedge. 

Syringa x ‘Bloomerang Dark Purple’ 

‘Bloomerang Dark Purple’ is slightly larger than others in the series, reaching 6’ in height and width. Its flower clusters are larger and more rounded in form. It has striking deep purple buds which open to classic deep lavender purple flowers. 

Syringa x  Bloomerang Pink Perfume’ 

This latest addition to the Bloomerang series has the same multi-season flower show, only this time in pink. Its dainty spikes of reddish purple buds open to fragrant, soft pink flowers in May. After the first heavy flush of flowers, it takes a short rest, flowering again intermittently until fall. Compact and rounded in shape, it grows 4’-5’ tall and wide. 

Syringa x hyacinthiflora  

Varieties of Syringa x hyacinthiflora are early blooming lilacs, often flowering up to 2 weeks before Syringa vulgaris varieties. They are known for their exceptional fragrance. They were developed as crosses between the common lilac, Syringa vulgaris, and the hardy northern Chinese native, Syringa oblata.  

Syringa x hyacinthiflora ‘Angel White’ 

‘White Angel’ has spectacular clusters of fragrant pure white flowers. It has an open-branched, upright form which makes a great hedge, screen or accent plant. It reaches a height of 12’ and a width of 10’. 

Syringa x hyacinthiflora ‘Declaration’  

Introduced by the U.S. National Arboretum, this outstanding cultivar has large, dramatic clusters of deep reddish-purple blooms that can be 8”-12” in length. It has the wonderful fragrance of the hyacinthiflora hybrids. Maturing at 6’-8’ tall and 5’-6’ wide, it is smaller than traditional lilacs, making it perfect for growing near a patio or in a mixed bed. 

Syringa x hyacinthiflora ‘Mount Baker’ 

Lilac ‘Mount Baker’

‘Mt. Baker’ has intensely fragrant white blossoms in spring. Growing 10’-12’ high and wide, it retains branches close to the ground, giving it a full appearance. The foliage has strong resistance to mildew and remains attractive over a long season.  

Syringa x hyacinthiflora ‘Pocahontas’ 

Lilac ‘Pocahontas’

A profuse and early bloomer, ‘Pocahontas’ features deep violet purple buds that open to fragrant, rich violet flowers. It is an upright and multi-stemmed plant that reaches 10’ tall and wide. The spring and summer foliage is a rich deep green that takes on bronzy red tones in the fall.  

Syringa x hyacinthiflora ‘Purple Glory’ 

‘Purple Glory’ has luxuriant deep purple flowers that are wonderfully fragrant. There is a heavy bloom set even on young plants. New leaves will emerge in spring with a purple blue blush, and in fall these purple highlights return. Dense foliage fills branches low to the ground. Growing 12’ tall and 8’ wide, it makes an attractive specimen plant and can also be massed in a hedge or screen. 

Syringa x ‘Tinkerbelle’ 

‘Tinkerbelle’ is a cross between 3 types of lilac, creating a compact, upright shrub that typically grows 4’-6’ tall and wide. It has lovely wine-colored buds that open to large, sweetly fragrant, pale pink flowers.  

Now in: Strawberry Plants

It’s the best time of year to plant your strawberry plants! Our selection is unbeatable this year with many of Uncle Mike’s favorites. Grown locally in our Woburn greenhouses, our strawberry varieties have been selected for their great performance in our New England garden. Strawberries grow best in full sun and are grouped into two categories: June-bearing and Ever-bearing. June-Bearing Strawberries produce a single, large crop per year during a 2-3 week period in late Spring. These traditionally grown strawberry plants produce a single flush of flowers before berries and many runners. They are classified in early, mid and late varieties. Our favorite is the All-Star variety for their taste and resistance to disease. Because they produce runners, they need more room in the garden and can make a great ground-cover.

Ever-bearing Strawberry plants produce fruit throughout the entire growing season. Beginning in Spring, with intermittent crops throughout summer and fall. They don’t send out many runners, which makes them great for containers or hanging baskets. Day-Neutral Strawberries – similar to ever-bearing, also send out few runners and have a continuous crop all season long vs. intermittent.

‘Ozark Beauty’

This day-neutral strawberry is famous for its large yields of bright red, usually large berries. Produces from June – September. They deliver fruit all summer with a large initial harvest and a steady crop the rest of the season.

‘Quinault’

Quinault is a terrific variety for containers. It is everbearing, and produces amazingly large and sweet strawberries. Very disease resistant!

 

‘Montana’

Strawberry Montana is a later addition to the strawberry varieties. Produces an abundance of conically-shaped medium-large fruits for the whole summer. Flavor is sweet. Everbearing.

‘Gasana’

Ideal for small containers and window boxes, Gasana has a compact growth habit with beautiful pink flowers. The flowers produce small to medium, conical berries with excellent flavor. Everbearing.

‘Delizz’

An all-American Selection in 2016! Easy to grow and vigorous, Delizz is a prolific producer of smaller, tasty strawberries all season long. Delizz is “day-neutral” vs everbearing. Modern day-neutral strawberries were developed to produce continuously all summer and into the fall. In contrast, traditional everbearing produces two to three separate crops each growing season.

“All-Star”

All Star produces a very high yield of extra sweet, juicy berries in mid-late season. Usually late Spring and Early Summer here in New England – hence Junebearing. They are vigorous plants and very resistant to disease! Plant with everbearing varieties for a even more enjoyment.

 

Alpine Strawberry

Alpine Strawberries are small fruits with wonderfully sweet taste. Extremely prolific, alpine strawberries don’t look like your typical grocery store strawberry fruit. Looking like a wild cultivar, alpines bear fruit throughout the season with production peaking in mid summer. Because of their wildflower tendancies, apline strawberries are often used as ground cover because of their vigorous spreading habits.

Video: Cold Tolerant Planter

Looking to create a doorstep planter for the holiday weekend? Stop in to find many cold-tolerant blooms that can be planted outdoors now! See how Julia arranged some of our favorite cool-weather annuals like tulips, hyacinth, nemesia, petunias and more. Our stores are filling up with fresh annuals you can plant outdoors now, and you won’t want to miss our vast selection of beautiful pottery to add a pop of color to welcome your dinner guests!

Video Look: What’s In Store April 19, 2019

Spring has sprung and we’re ready for Easter and Passover this weekend! Find blooming trees and shrubs in our nurseries, festive plants and decor in our greenhouses and all of the expert advice you’ll need to spruce up the home and yard. Visit our full-service florists in Tewksbury and Winchester for fresh-cut flowers and potted arrangements for holiday decor and host gifts too!

Now Blooming in the Nursery: Forsythia

Forsythia x intermedia ‘Lynwood Gold’

The bright yellow flowers of Forsythia are a sure sign that winter is behind us. Long a staple in gardens throughout New England, we sometimes take these familiar stalwarts for granted. But here is a variety that will inspire you to renew your acquaintance with this useful shrub.

Forsythia ‘Lynwood Gold’ offers the largest flowers of any Forsythia, creating a spectacular display. It has deep golden yellow flowers which literally cover the branches with bloom. The effect is stunning. The foliage emerges after the flowers fade and in autumn, the leaves turn a lovely butter yellow.

Upright in its growth habit, ‘Lynwood Gold’ will grow 6’-8’ in height and a similar width. It is easily pruned to maintain a desired size; however, pruning should be done immediately after flowering as flower buds for next spring will form during this summer. A mid-summer or fall pruning will remove next year’s flower show.

Forsythia performs best in full sun. It can be grown as a specimen plant or planted in a row to create an attractive deciduous hedge. And who can resist cutting a few branches of Forsythia as the blooms begin to open and bringing them indoors for a beautiful spring bouquet!

Video Look: Sprucing Up for Spring

Looking for some inspiration to dress up the house this weekend? See how Julia spruced up the front of our Winchester store with our locally-grown, cold-tolerant spring bulbs and pansies.

Now In: Summer Flowering Bulbs

PLANT NOW FOR SUMMER ENJOYMENT

Summer is arguably the most satisfying time of year for the gardener. Gone are the worries of an impending frost. Departed are spring’s gray skies and torrential downpours. Sunshine is plentiful, the soil is warm and everything wants to grow, grow, grow! And, this year, more than ever, bulbs are sure to be the shining star of the summer garden.

Typically, when bulbs are mentioned, many conjure up visions of spring blooming types like tulips, daffodils and hyacinths. There is, however, an amazing list of summer bloomers that provide an unmatched range of color, form and texture in the landscape, right at the height of the growing season. These beauties bloom all summer long and into the warmth of early autumn.

Most summer flowering bulbs (rhizomes, tubers, corms) are spring planted, after the last frost in our New England climate. There are a couple exceptions like Alliums, which are planted in the fall, and Hybrid Lilies, planted in either the fall or spring. Also, many but not all, summer bulbs are tender. Tender bulbs should either be dug immediately before or after the first frost and stored for the winter, or you may simply replace the following year. With a number of these bulbs being so affordable, they lend themselves to be purchased and planted anew each season.
Here are some of our favorites:
BEGONIAS Tuberous begonias add color to the shadier areas of the garden. Available in both cascading and upright forms, these beauties look fantastic in hanging baskets and in just about any type of container. Make certain, however, that your container is well drained. Begonias like their soil moist but not wet. It can take up to three months for tuberous begonias to bloom after planting.

CALADIUM Another shade loving plant, Caladium is grown primarily for its colorful foliage. Caladiums make a bright, unique and stunning addition to darker sections of the garden with their mottled, heart shaped leaves in green, pink, red and white.

DAHLIAS What can we say about Dahlias? Dahlias are the superstar of the summer garden and they never fail to steal the show. Available in oh-so-many sizes, bloom types and colors, the choice is nearly limitless. If we could grow just one type of summer flowering bulb, it would be Dahlia. Plant tubers in warm soil after all danger of frost has passed. Shorter varieties may be grown in pots. These brilliant beauties will bloom their magnificent heads off until hit with a heavy frost after which the tubers are dug and stored for the winter. Dahlias are, by far, the most diversified and colorful cut flower for summer bouquets. Check out the Dinner Plate series— with GIANT blooms that are sure to impress!

LILIES Hybrid Lilies are winter hardy and may be planted in the spring too. Some are highly fragrant and all varieties make excellent cut flowers!

Featured: Sweet Peet Organic Mulch

Sweet Peet® is the premium organic mulch for flower and vegetable gardens. Sweet Peet® buffers both acid and alkaline (low and High pH) soils by helping to maintain the desired gardening Sweet Spot. During its formulation, Sweet Peet® goes through a thermal stage where weeds and weed seeds are destroyed, preventing contamination in your garden.

Sweet Peet® is the best organic mulch for a vegetable garden because it enriches the soil, transforms into humus, improves tilth, encourages beneficial earthworms and replenishes microbes that are often destroyed by harsh chemicals and acid rain.

Like most mulches, Sweet Peet® suppresses weeds by smothering the soil. But Sweet Peet does more; it is produced to optimize the naturally occurring cat-ion exchange which creates an undesirable growing medium for weeds.