Mahoney's Garden Center | Hydrangeas
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HYDRANGEAS

Hydrangeas are in the midst of a style revolution. Many exciting new varieties are rebloomers, some are two-toned, new flower forms are appearing and plant sizes are shrinking. Hydrangeas of every kind have always had a lot going for them. All make terrific cut flowers and many dry well, too. They’re easy to grow if planted in the right situations: dappled shade all day; or early morning/late evening sun and shade for the rest of the day. They require ample, regular water and well- draining, well-amended soil.

 

Bigleaf hydrangeas (H. macrophylla) often get the most attention, but other types are just as lovely and have their own reasons to be grown. Hardy hydrangeas (H. paniculata) will tolerate dryer soil, and their large, usually pointed panicles can be heavily flushed with pink. Some flower heads are loose and open, creating a lacy effect. The large and dramatically cut leaves of oakleaf hydrangeas (H. quercifolia) provide beautiful red fall color after the huge flower clusters fade to bronze and pink. The lacy and dainty flowers of mountain hydrangea (H. serrata) appear above dark, colorful stems, and the clusters

 

The only critical thing you need to know is the correct way to prune each type. For those that bloom on new wood, prune in earliest spring while still dormant. For those blooming on old wood, you should prune right after flowering, removing up to one-third of the shrub’s branches to near the ground. The new growth that appears will bloom next year. See the accompanying guide to the various types. As mentioned, there’s a new category, however: rebloomers. With these, you’ll need to remove the spent blooms and cutting back the stems by up to 1/3. New blooming growth will appear the same season as well as the following year. See the accompanying chart for how to prune each type.

Quick Guide to Pruning Hydrangeas

 

 

– Blooms on OLD wood –

(Prune 1/3 of branches to ground after flowering)

H. macrophylla
(bigleaf hydrangea)

H. quercifolia
(oakleaf hydrangea)

H. serrata
(mountain hydrangea)

– Blooms on NEW wood –

(Prune up to 1/3 of plant late during dormancy)

H. arborescens
(smoothleaf hydrangea)

H. aspera

H. paniculata
(hardy hydrangea)

BIG LEAF HYDRANGEAS

Hydrangea macrophylla – also known as florist’s hydrangea, hortensia, mophead, or lacecap. With many new introductions, especially from the Endless Summer series of rebloomers. Please note supplies and selections will vary at each location. If you are looking for a particular variety, please call us first.

Endless Summer®

This groundbreaking introduction to the Endless Summer series was a major upgrade to Hydrangea macrophylla, or mophead hydrangeas with continuous blooms all summer long. The Original continues to be well loved for big round blue or pink blooms.

BloomStruck®

Displaying vivid purple or rose-pink flower heads, BloomStruck® is the newest Hydrangea macrophylla variety in the Endless Summer collection. It has sturdy red stems and big, beautiful blooms all summer long. Depending on soil pH, you can have vivid rose-pink or purple hydrangea flower heads.

Blushing Bride®

Pure white hydrangea blooms mature to a sweet, pink blush make Blushing Bride a favorite for gardens, landscapes and cut flower hydrangea arrangements. A favorite of European gardeners, Blushing Bride can serve as a focal point or can be used in the garden to separate louder, harsher colors providing harmony and ease. Blooms  all summer long.

Twist-n-Shout®

Twist-n-Shout®, the first re-blooming lacecap hydrangea, boasts picturesque deep pink or periwinkle blue hydrangea flowers (depending on soil pH) from late spring through fall. With loads of dependable blooms and intense hydrangea colors, these lacecap hydrangea have become a favorite for everyone from new gardeners to Master Gardeners!

Zebra

Green flowers turn to white and measure 3.5 inches tall and 5.5 inches wide, and bloom all summer. The contrasting near-black stems provide a striking combination. Grows to 4 feet tall and 3 feet wide.

L.A. Dreamin’ ®

First macrophylla to show blue, pink and everything in between on the same plant. As L.A. Dreamin’® matures, it can bloom in shades of blue, purple, and pink—at the same time, on the same plant. Great reblooming power!

Nantucket Blue®

A repeat-blooming Hydrangea with abundant blue flowers from spring through fall. Flowers will be pink in alkaline soils, acidify the soil to turn the flowers blue. A rapid grower reaching 4 to 6 feet tall and wide.

Let’s Dance® Rhythmic Blue™

Let’s Dance reblooming hydrangea flowers in early summer, then reblooms in later summer. The real show, however, is its easy shift from pink to rich amethyst-blue flowers by adjusting the soil pH. It has the richest, most vibrant blue seen on a hydrangea!

PANICLE  & OAKLEAF HYDRANGEAS

Hydrangea paniculata and Hydrangea quercifolia have distinct blooms and foliage. Paniculata varieties bloom on new wood: prune in late winter/early spring. Oakleaf varieties bloom on old wood: do not prune, protect in winter. Please note supplies and selections will vary at each location. If you are looking for a particular variety, please call us first.

Bobo®

Loads of flowers on a tiny plant! This dwarf hydrangea will turn heads! Bobo is a delightful plant that is engulfed by large white flowers in summer. The flowers are held upright on strong stems, and continue to grow and lengthen as they bloom. In fall they can turn pinkish. It is an undeniable asset to any garden, particularly those in which space is limited

Limelight & Little Lime®

Huge, long-blooming, football-shaped flowers open in an elegant celadon green that looks fresh and clean in summer’s heat. The blooms age to an array of pink, red, and burgundy which persists through frost for months of irresistible flowers. Little Lime is Limelight’s sibling, with a compact growing habit for small space gardening.

QuickFire® & Little Quick Fire®

The first to bloom! Quick Fire blooms about a month before other paniculata varieties. Flowers open white then turn pink, and will be an extremely dark rosy-pink in the fall. The flowers on Quick Fire are not affected by soil pH. They are produced on ‘new wood’ and will bloom after even the harshest winters. Little Quick Fire is a compact sibling of Quick Fire, perfect for small space gardening.

Alice Oakleaf

Among the largest of the Oakleaf Hydrangeas, this bold selection is handsome and stately for foundation or border. It has deeply lobed, oak-like leaves and a profusion of large white blooms. An added bonus, foliage turns brilliant crimson in fall.

Ruby Slippers Oakleaf

A profusion of exceptionally large, white blooms in summer quickly age to deep pink. Robust blooms remain upright even after heavy rains. Dark green, deeply lobed oak-like foliage turns brilliant mahogany in fall. Compact form works in smaller landscapes. Useful for mass planting, hedge or border.

Pinky Winky®

Large white panicles open in mid to late summer, and as summer turns to fall the florets at the base of the panicles turn pink. The flower panicles continue to grow, producing new white florets at the tip. The result is spectacular two-toned flower panicles that can reach up to 16 inches in length!

MOUNTAIN HYDRANGEAS

Hydrangea serrata – Blooms on old wood: do not prune. Please note supplies and selections will vary at each location. If you are looking for a particular variety, please call us first.

Tuff Stuff™ & Tiny Tuff Stuff™

Very hardy reblooming hydrangea! This plant delivers on both accounts. Its attractive, reddish-pink lacecap flowers create a mass of color in early summer, and it continues to produce new flowers right up until frost. The semi-double to double florets begin with creamy coloration in the center before maturing to an intense pink. Flowers may shift to blue in acidic soils. Try Tiny Tuff Stuff for gardening in small spaces!

Bluebird Lacecap Hydrangea

Spectacular lace-cap bloom has a ring of sea-blue sterile florets surrounding a large cluster of rich blue fertile flowers. Blooms in early summer on old wood. Flowers will attain best blue tint in acid soils. Attractive reddish fall foliage. Makes a wonderful accent or border shrub.

SMOOTH HYDRANGEAS

Hydrangea arborescens – Bloom on new wood: prune
in late winter/early spring. Please note supplies and selections will vary at each location. If you are looking for a particular variety, please call us first.

Anabelle

Annabelle features stunning pure white flowers, much larger than the species- up to 12 inches across! Flowers appear in late spring to summer, often continuing into fall. This full, lush shrub needs plenty of room to show off its spectacular beauty. A native plant!

Incrediball®

This adaptable native plant produces huge flowers (as much as 12″ across) and is both reliable and beautiful. Flowers open green, then mature to white before turning green at the end of their life cycle. Very cold hardy Incrediball blooms on new growth so even very cold winters won’t keep it from blooming. The flowers are held upright on very sturdy stems, so they don’t flop like ‘Annabelle’ will.