FALL IS FOR PLANTING

.. Maybe Even the best time for planting…

It happens every year, people from towns near and far make their spring pilgrimage to Mahoney’s. They come filled with anticipation of new perennials, lush lawns, and flowering shrubs. Simply put, it’s spring, and they want to plant something. No question of course, that spring is a great time to plant, but what many people don’t realize is that fall is not only an equally good time to plant, in many ways it’s better.

To understand why, it’s good to remember that plants do not think like people. While we lament the end of summer, plants – especially newly planted plants – find the cooler days far less stressful. We may dig in our closets for a sweater, but for plants the soil feels warm, which boosts root growth. And while fall rains seem gloomy to us, plants much prefer it to the hot dry summer. And this is true for a whole host of plants: trees, shrubs, perennials, roses, ornamental grasses and even your lawn. Practically anything planted now will have extra time to establish, so when it’s time to grow and flower next year, it will give you a great show at your house, not at the garden center.

 

HOW LATE INTO THE FALL CAN YOU PLANT?

Fact is, if the ground isn’t frozen and you can still dig the hole, you can still plant. Planting in September and October however allows that much more time for plants to become established, so sooner is better.

There are other reasons fall is a great time for planting. Unlike a lot of garden centers that wind down for the year, Mahoney’s brings in lots of fresh new plants every fall, especially shrubs. Check out our new shipments arriving daily. Planting them now will allow you to enjoy the foliage throughout all seasons, including color changes this fall.

Fall is also the unofficial “hide your neighbor” season. Why, we’re not sure, but a lot of people plant hedges in the fall. We’ll have fresh arborvitae, boxwood and other hedging evergreens as well as privet, hydrangeas, ninebark, spirea, weigela and many more deciduous shrubs. (Social note: for neighbors that need immediate hiding, we carry large and fast growing hedge shrubs. The ‘Green Giant’ arborvitae is especially popular)

Also very popular in the fall are miniature evergreens for urns, containers and window boxes. They add a festive touch for the holidays, and with a little protective care they will survive in a container through the winter. If you want to be greeted with tulips, daffodils and other flowers next spring, you have to plant the bulbs in fall.

Perennials especially benefit from the extra time in the ground before next spring. We bring in a lot of fresh perennials in the fall – especially the fall blooming varieties. We also have a wide selection of ornamental grasses – great for landscapes or containers.

Speaking of grasses, fall is the very best time to pay attention to your lawn. Not only do most lawns need a serious pick-me-up after the summer heat and dry spells, the warm fall soil encourages quick germination and cool air temperatures reduce stress.

 

 

 

Video Look: What’s In Store

The colors of summer are in bloom! Fresh perennials, shrubs, annuals and houseplants are arriving weekly. Browse our fantastic pottery selection, and find outdoor furniture in Winchester & Falmouth!

 

 

VIDEO LOOK: What’s In Store

Around here, Mother’s Day means a few things. Every year it’s the unofficial beginning of gardening season, when warmer days and nights are (hopefully) on the horizon. With fresh plants arriving daily, you’ll find the best plant selection of the year– many of which make excellent gifts for Mom!

A NOTE ABOUT CURBSIDE ORDERS

In recent weeks we have seen unprecedented requests for curbside orders via phone or email. We are humbled by the response and truly appreciate your business. Due to increased traffic in-store, we are unable to offer curbside ordering services via email or phone for the month of May. We encourage customers to shop weekday mornings and late afternoons for lower customer volumes and easier social distancing.  

We are excited to offer online ordering on select products through our Winchester store. There you can shop florist arrangements, bulk mulches and bagged goods, lawn care, soils and grass seed. We are actively working to roll this platform out to other Mahoney’s locations with an increased product offering:

 

SHOP ONLINE HERE

 

Thank you for your understanding. Happy Spring!

Your Friends at Mahoney’s

 

 

 

It’s not too late for a beautiful lawn!

 

With this chilly weather, we know many of you might feel you’ve missed the crabgrass preventer application window. The age old adage of ‘apply when the forsythia blooms’, makes many worry they have missed the boat on an application! Fear not! Jonathan Green’s Step 1 contains an ingredient that allows you to apply after your weeds have begun to germinate! 

 

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To prevent crabgrass this summer, it’s important to treat early in the Spring season. Typically the first step, or ‘Step 1‘ of a lawn program consists of a crabgrass preventer that must be applied before the crabgrass has germinated. Even though the crabgrass has already germinated this season, you can still prevent the problem. While it’s too late to apply many of the national brand’s crabgrass preventers, we carry a really unique product with a wider application window.

 

Jonathan Green’s Crabgrass Preventer plus Greenup contains the newest technology with Dimension® Crabgrass Control Herbicide. Despite a late start, you can still apply this for another couple weeks as it prevents crabgrass both BEFORE and AFTER it germinates. We recommend applying as soon as possible! It will also control many other grassy and broadleaf weeds and provides a slow-release nitrogen for a lush, green lawn.

Now in bud and bloom: Lilacs

The fragrance of lilac is often associated with feelings of “home” or other pleasant memories. We seem able to remember the fragrance even decades later. The clusters of fragrant flowers that adorn the lilac bush in mid to late spring mean that summer is just around the corner.  

Lilac is easily grown in well-drained soil. It will bloom its best in full sun conditions. Choose a location that allows for good air circulation to minimize the potential for mildew on the leaves. Prompt removal of faded flower panicles will help increase the bloom count for the following year. This is also the best time to prune to control the size of the plant, if that is necessary. Pruning is best done by the first week in July. After this time, the plant will be setting next year’s flower buds and pruning will sacrifice next year’s flower show. 

Planting a lilac near the house means that the heady fragrance can waft through open windows. Planted as a hedge, they make an effective, not to mention fragrant, screen. As part of a mixed border planting, they mix beautifully with roses and peonies.  

As a cut flower, they are a delight. Fill a vase with cool water. Using a sharp pair of hand pruners, cut when the lilac panicle (the entire cluster of flowers) is one-quarter to one-half open. Use your pruners to split the stem a couple of inches up the center to allow the stem to take up water. It is not necessary to crush the stem. Crushing the stem will not help the lilac take up water.   

 

Syringa meyeri Palabin 

Also known as Dwarf Korean Lilac, ‘Palabin’ is smaller, denser and more rounded in its habit than traditional lilacs. It typically grows 4’-5’ feet tall and 5’-7’ wide, making it suitable for small gardens. It has very fragrant purple flowers. They are arranged in 4” clusters that are perfectly scaled to the shrub. This variety is particularly resistant to powdery mildew.  

Syringa patula ‘Miss Kim’ 

‘Miss Kim’ is a compact, upright variety which grows 4’-7′ tall with a similar spread. It has deep purple buds that open to reveal clusters of 3” long, highly fragrant, lavender blue flowers. The flowers bloom slightly later than other lilacs, extending that heavenly season of lilac fragrance. Leaves are very resistant to powdery mildew. They are burgundy tinged in the fall, adding to this shrub’s appeal.  

Syringa reticulata ‘Ivory Silk’ (Chinese tree lilac) 

Syringa vulgaris ‘Ivory Silk’ is a small tree or large shrub which grows 20’ tall with a rounded crown.  It has beautiful 12” long, creamy white, fragrant flowers with a captivating fragrance. Blooming later than most other species of lilac, its beautiful show takes place in late May and into the summer.  Its beauty is enhanced by rich green foliage and attractive reddish brown bark. ‘Ivory Silk’ is lovely as a specimen tree in the landscape. It can also be used in the mixed border.  

Syringa vulgaris ’Sensation’ 

‘Sensation’ is unusual in that its flowers are bi-colored. The clusters of blooms are composed of individual purple flowers, each edged in white. They are sweetly fragrant. The effect is charming. Rich green foliage is held on upright branches. In time it reaches a height of 10’-12’ and a width of 6’. ‘Sensation’ will be a sensation in your garden.  

 

Reblooming Lilacs 

In recent years plant breeders have developed lilacs with the ability to rebloom. After the first flush of springtime bloom, these lilacs take a rest in the heat of summer before flowering again later in the summer and into the fall. The second bloom cycle is not as heavy as the first, but it is still showy. Pruning immediately after the spring bloom will create a fuller shrub with more branches and encourage more flowers. These lilacs display good mildew resistance. Their compact size allows them to fit into smaller landscapes and they make a nice addition to perennial beds, mixed borders and foundation plantings.  The Bloomerang series have large and fragrant flower clusters displayed on a dense and branching shrub which is perfectly sized for the small garden. 

Syringa x ‘Bloomerang Purple’ 

Clusters of lilac purple, sweetly scented flowers cover the branches in spring and continue off and on until frost. It grows 4’-5’ in height and width, making it suitable for small spaces. It is a nice addition to the mixed border and can be used to create a fragrant, low hedge. 

Syringa x ‘Bloomerang Dark Purple’ 

‘Bloomerang Dark Purple’ is slightly larger than others in the series, reaching 6’ in height and width. Its flower clusters are larger and more rounded in form. It has striking deep purple buds which open to classic deep lavender purple flowers. 

 

Syringa x hyacinthiflora ‘Angel White’ 

‘White Angel’ has spectacular clusters of fragrant pure white flowers. It has an open-branched, upright form which makes a great hedge, screen or accent plant. It reaches a height of 12’ and a width of 10’. 

Syringa x hyacinthiflora ‘Declaration’  

Introduced by the U.S. National Arboretum, this outstanding cultivar has large, dramatic clusters of deep reddish-purple blooms that can be 8”-12” in length. It has the wonderful fragrance of the hyacinthiflora hybrids. Maturing at 6’-8’ tall and 5’-6’ wide, it is smaller than traditional lilacs, making it perfect for growing near a patio or in a mixed bed. 

Syringa x hyacinthiflora ‘Mount Baker’ 

Lilac ‘Mount Baker’

‘Mt. Baker’ has intensely fragrant white blossoms in spring. Growing 10’-12’ high and wide, it retains branches close to the ground, giving it a full appearance. The foliage has strong resistance to mildew and remains attractive over a long season.  

Syringa x hyacinthiflora ‘Pocahontas’ 

Lilac ‘Pocahontas’

A profuse and early bloomer, ‘Pocahontas’ features deep violet purple buds that open to fragrant, rich violet flowers. It is an upright and multi-stemmed plant that reaches 10’ tall and wide. The spring and summer foliage is a rich deep green that takes on bronzy red tones in the fall.  

Syringa x hyacinthiflora ‘Purple Glory’ 

‘Purple Glory’ has luxuriant deep purple flowers that are wonderfully fragrant. There is a heavy bloom set even on young plants. New leaves will emerge in spring with a purple blue blush, and in fall these purple highlights return. Dense foliage fills branches low to the ground. Growing 12’ tall and 8’ wide, it makes an attractive specimen plant and can also be massed in a hedge or screen. 

 

Local Vendor Spotlight: Neptune’s Harvest

Neptune’s Harvest (a division of Ocean Crest Seafoods, Inc., established in Gloucester in 1965), was started in 1986 an as endeavor to utilize fresh fish scraps left behind after the filleting process. When a fish is filleted, the process of removing the edible portion of the fish leaves behind 70% of the actual fish! Years ago, the scraps left behind were brought out to sea and dumped back into the ocean.

 

Ocean Crest Seafoods, Inc. and Neptune’s Harvest, along with the state of Massachusetts and local universities, developed a process in which they changed an environmental hazard into an environmental benefit. After years of trial and error, and refining their products, Neptune’s Harvest produces the finest organic liquid fish fertilizers available today. They are derived from the mineral rich Atlantic Ocean–nature’s perfect source for the nutrients plants and soil need.

 

A few reasons why Neptune’s Harvest is a favorite local product of ours:

  • Locally owned, family-run business in Gloucester, MA
  • 100% organic and eco-friendly–won’t burn plants or roots and does not pollute the environment
  • They use a unique cold process that protects vitamins, minerals, macro and micro nutrients, amino acids, etc–leaving them readily available for your plants
  • Neptune’s Harvest builds sugars in plants, which makes them healthier and less susceptible to fungus, disease, and insect damage
  • Their liquid fertilizer has an indefinite shelf life, until water is added
  • When using it, vegetables, fruit, and herbs taste better; flowers have more vivid colors and blooms are more plentiful and longer lasting
  • Excellent deer repellant too

 

How To Identify Your Hydrangeas

Laura from Garden Answer shows us the different types of hydrangeas and what makes each so special! Learn bloom time, pruning habits and some great varieties!

Scenes from the Store: April 22

Spring is in full swing! Our greenhouses are loading up with potted hanging baskets, annuals and flowering tropical plants! Flowering trees and shrubs are in-bloom in the nursery, as well as early-season perennials! Our veggie and herb sections are loading up and we’ve got tons of beautifully pottery and planters to brighten the yard.

 

 

It’s time to put out your hummingbird feeders!

 

info from  Hummingbird Central

Hummingbirds spend the winter in Central America or Mexico, and migrate north to their breeding grounds in the southern U.S. and western states as early as February, and to areas further north later in the spring. This is usually around the end of April for New England. The first arrivals in spring are usually males. Some, however, do not migrate, in areas like California and the upper Pacific coast.

The Migration

Although there are differing views in the birding community as to what triggers the start of migration, it is generally thought that hummingbirds sense changes in daylight duration, and changes in the abundance of flowers, nectar and insects. Instinct also plays a role in making the decision to migrate.

During migration, a hummingbird’s heart beats up to 1,260 times a minute, and its wings flap 15 to 80 times a second. To support this high energy level, a hummingbird will typically gain 25-40% of their body weight before they start migration in order to make the long trek over land, and water.

They fly alone, often on the same path they have flown earlier in their life, and fly low, just above tree tops or water. Young hummingbirds must navigate without parental guidance.

Hummingbirds fly by day when nectar sources such as flowers are more abundant. Flying low allows the birds to see, and stop at, food supplies along the way. They are also experts at using tail winds to help reach their destination faster and by consuming less energy and body fat. Research indicates a hummingbird can travel as much as 23 miles in one day.

The importance of feeding

With sightings in New England already, it’s an important time to make sure your yard is ready to feed the migrating hummingbirds. Stops along the way may be for a few minutes, or a few days at more favorable locations with abundant food supplies. Feeding hummingbirds is an easy, rewarding and inexpensive experience. All you need is a feeder, table sugar and water. We have a variety of feeders specifically designed for hummingbirds that allows easy access, easy filling and easy cleaning. Feeders are usually bright in color to make spotting them from afar easy! Place the feeder in a shady spot so the nectar will last longer, out of reach of pets or other critters. Remember, hummingbirds will not feed if ants, bees or other insects are feeding from. This is why it is imperative to use a feeder specifically designed for hummingbirds. We sell hummingbird feeders that make it difficult for pests like ants to find the nectar. The best placement is in front of a window so you can catch a glimpse of the hummingbirds from inside!

Unlike other birds, hummingbirds feed on nectar, not seed. In nature, they eat flower nectar of energy and insects for protein. They are naturally attracted by a number of flowering plants that allow easy access to the nectar. In early Spring where flowering plants are less available, feeders provide the nutrition hummingbirds require along their migration paths. We sell prepared nectar, or you can do it yourself at home!

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