Tick & Mosquito Solutions

Don’t let ticks and mosquitoes hold you hostage inside this Spring and Summer! Here are some of our favorite products to repel those unwanted garden and patio guests.

JONATHAN GREEN INSECT CONTROL Organically kill and repel ticks! Organic Insect Control kills and repels over 100 insect pests with a patented blend of organic plant oils including ants, fleas, spiders, ticks, chinch bugs, ants, earwigs, army worms, spiders, billbugs, beetles, mealybugs, millipedes and many other lawn insects. This product is environmentally safe. Uses scientific technology based on the natural defenses that plants use to protect themselves against insects and disease. These essential plant oils work by blocking specific neural pathways called Octopamine receptors that only exist in insects, therefore having no adverse effect on mammals, birds or fish. Causes an immediate “knock-down” followed rapidly by the insects’ death. These botanical formulas have strong repellency characteristics that keep new bugs from coming into the area.

 

DAMMINIX® TICK TUBES Did you know that ticks get lyme disease from mice, not deer? Damminix Ticks Tubes® rely on the natural nesting instincts of mice to take the battle to source and deliver tick controlling permethrin directly to this host animal and the ticks it infects.

 

EVERGUARD™ TICK & MOSQUITO REPELLENT Designed to safely repel tick and mosquitoes. Attach a hose and spray around leaf litter, around shrubs, under decks, shaded areas and lawns. Contains citronella, lemongrass, cedarwood, thyme, cinnamon and garlic oils.

 

BONIDE® MOSQUITO-BEATER® GRANULES Made with natural ingredients. A field tested formula. Effectively repels for up to 3 weeks. Non – toxic, biodegradable and pleasantly scented. Easy to use shaker applicators. Enjoy mosquito free surroundings, any place, anytime.

 

BONIDE® MOSQUITO-BEATER® READY-TO-SPRAY Kills and repels mosquitoes, flies, and gnats…1 qt. protects 5000 sq. ft. Simply attach to garden hose and apply. Low odor, water based Permethrin.

 

BONIDE® ANT, FLEA & TICK Fast-acting, long lasting (4 weeks) insect control for lawns and home foundations. Great for ants, fleas, ticks, crickets, spiders, silverfish and more! 10lbs treats 5,000 SF.

Featured Perennial: Coreopsis Leading Lady Series

The Leading Lady Series of Coreopsis offers an early and long blooming season from June through September. They grow 18”-24” high and form a mound 12”-15” wide. They come through cold winters to perform well in hot summers, showing good mildew resistance. Movie buffs will love the fun naming convention!  ‘Sophia’, named after Sophia Loren, covers herself with large, showy, tubular yellow blossoms. ‘Charlize’, after Charlize Theron, has large, frilly, soft yellow double blooms. ‘Lauren’, after Lauren Bacall, has masses of large, single yellow flowers.

What’s In Store: May 25, 2018

This beautiful sunshine and the long weekend are giving us a taste of the tropics! It’s the perfect time to dress up your patio planters with flowering tropical plants like mandevilla, hibiscus and bougainvillea. With beautiful blooms all summer long, it’s like having a little piece of vacation in the islands in your own back yard. There’s still time to plant your veggies, tomatoes and herbs too! Find the best selection of the season now of our locally-grown line of Uncle Mike’s herbs and veggies!

Winter Moth: What You Need to Know

Originally introduced to North America from Europe, winter moths, and the devastation they bring can be found  throughout New England – especially in areas around Boston and Cape Cod. They seem to prefer apple, blueberry, cherry and crab-apple fruit trees, but they also feed on oaks, maples and ash. There is no gentle way to say this; it’s a very serious problem.

​​Adult moths emerge from soil around late November, and females lay eggs on tree trunks, house siding, and other outdoor surfaces through January. The eggs hatch before spring buds break. The young larvae (tiny inchworms caterpillars) tunnel into buds where they feed – often before the buds even open. After they eat up one bud, the larvae move to the next bud using wind and silk strands, called “ballooning”. The result is partial to significant defoliation. If a tree is defoliated 3 years in a row it’s at a high risk of death!

what you can do

To date, there is no easy solution, nonetheless it’s critical that you do as much as possible or your trees will be at risk.  Here are ways you can combat the problem: In early spring (late March or up until the leaves start to open) spray All Seasons Horticultural Oil from Bonide. It’s an all-natural oil that helps prevent winter moth eggs from hatching. Warning: if you saw adult moths last December, DON’T WAIT to look for them this spring – the larvae do an awful amount of damage as they become visible.
Once the leaves start to open, it’s too late for the Hort Oil – now it’s time to spray either Bonide’s all-natural Thuricide or all-natural Captain Jack’s Deadbug Brew. Both will kill winter moth caterpillars, but Capt. Jacks will kill even when they get big. Important notes: To help a defoliated tree or shrub survive the summer, make sure to water deeply once a week. Also, even though all three Bonide products are all-natural, you’ll still want to avoid wet contact with bees. If any tree or shrub attracts bees, do not spray when it is in flower. Any other time of year, even if not in flower, minimize contact with bees by spraying either very early in the morning or after sunset – you want time for sprays to dry while bees are not active.

How To Identify Your Hydrangeas

Laura from Garden Answer shows us the different types of hydrangeas and what makes each so special! Learn bloom time, pruning habits and some great varieties!

What’s In Store: May 11, 2018

It’s Mother’s Day weekend and that means our stores are full of beautiful blooms like dahlias, geraniums, hydrangeas, lilacs, roses and more! Our premium hanging baskets make a fantastic gift for Mom too! Visit our full-service florists in Winchester and Tewksbury for fresh cut flower bouquets, vase arrangements, colorful potted baskets and more! Don’t miss our patio furniture showrooms in Winchester and Falmouth too! For great gift ideas for Mom visit: http://mahoneysgarden.com/great-gifts-for-mom/

It’s not too late for a beautiful lawn!

 

With the slow start to the Spring season and this week’s hot weather, we know many of you might feel you’ve missed the crabgrass preventer application window. The age old adage of ‘apply when the forsythia blooms’, makes many worry they have missed the boat on an application! Fear not! Jonathan Green’s Step 1 contains an ingredient that allows you to apply after your weeds have begun to germinate! 

 

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To prevent crabgrass this summer, it’s important to treat early in the Spring season. Typically the first step, or ‘Step 1‘ of a lawn program consists of a crabgrass preventer that must be applied before the crabgrass has germinated. Even though the crabgrass has already germinated this season, you can still prevent the problem. While it’s too late to apply many of the national brand’s crabgrass preventers, we carry a really unique product with a wider application window.

 

Jonathan Green’s Crabgrass Preventer plus Greenup contains the newest technology with Dimension® Crabgrass Control Herbicide. Despite a late start, you can still apply this for another couple weeks as it prevents crabgrass both BEFORE and AFTER it germinates. We recommend applying as soon as possible! It will also control many other grassy and broadleaf weeds and provides a slow-release nitrogen for a lush, green lawn.

What’s In Store: May 4, 2018

We’re filled to the brim for the weekend! Find lilacs in bud and bloom, early-blooming perennials, colorful annual hanging baskets, locally-grown edibles, beautiful pottery and more!

Now in bud and bloom: Lilacs

The fragrance of lilac is often associated with feelings of “home” or other pleasant memories. We seem able to remember the fragrance even decades later. The clusters of fragrant flowers that adorn the lilac bush in mid to late spring mean that summer is just around the corner.  

Lilac is easily grown in well-drained soil. It will bloom its best in full sun conditions. Choose a location that allows for good air circulation to minimize the potential for mildew on the leaves. Prompt removal of faded flower panicles will help increase the bloom count for the following year. This is also the best time to prune to control the size of the plant, if that is necessary. Pruning is best done by the first week in July. After this time, the plant will be setting next year’s flower buds and pruning will sacrifice next year’s flower show. 

Planting a lilac near the house means that the heady fragrance can waft through open windows. Planted as a hedge, they make an effective, not to mention fragrant, screen. As part of a mixed border planting, they mix beautifully with roses and peonies.  

As a cut flower, they are a delight. Fill a vase with cool water. Using a sharp pair of hand pruners, cut when the lilac panicle (the entire cluster of flowers) is one-quarter to one-half open. Use your pruners to split the stem a couple of inches up the center to allow the stem to take up water. It is not necessary to crush the stem. Crushing the stem will not help the lilac take up water.   

 

Syringa meyeri Palabin 

Also known as Dwarf Korean Lilac, ‘Palabin’ is smaller, denser and more rounded in its habit than traditional lilacs. It typically grows 4’-5’ feet tall and 5’-7’ wide, making it suitable for small gardens. It has very fragrant purple flowers. They are arranged in 4” clusters that are perfectly scaled to the shrub. This variety is particularly resistant to powdery mildew.  

Syringa patula ‘Miss Kim’ 

‘Miss Kim’ is a compact, upright variety which grows 4’-7′ tall with a similar spread. It has deep purple buds that open to reveal clusters of 3” long, highly fragrant, lavender blue flowers. The flowers bloom slightly later than other lilacs, extending that heavenly season of lilac fragrance. Leaves are very resistant to powdery mildew. They are burgundy tinged in the fall, adding to this shrub’s appeal.  

Syringa reticulata ‘Ivory Silk’ (Chinese tree lilac) 

Syringa vulgaris ‘Ivory Silk’ is a small tree or large shrub which grows 20’ tall with a rounded crown.  It has beautiful 12” long, creamy white, fragrant flowers with a captivating fragrance. Blooming later than most other species of lilac, its beautiful show takes place in late May and into the summer.  Its beauty is enhanced by rich green foliage and attractive reddish brown bark. ‘Ivory Silk’ is lovely as a specimen tree in the landscape. It can also be used in the mixed border.  

Syringa vulgaris ‘Charles Joly’ 

Hybridized by the famous French plantsman, Victor Lemoine, in 1896, ‘Charles Joly’ has deep reddish-purple, double flowers that are extremely fragrant. Heart shaped green leaves on upright branches contribute to this handsome shrub. It matures to a height of 10’-12’. An outstanding variety, it was given the Royal Horticultural Society’s Award of Garden Merit.  

Syringa vulgaris ‘Krasavitsa Moscovy’ 

Perhaps the name of this shrub merits some explanation. Syringa is Latin for lilac and vulgaris is the Latin word meaning “of the common people, commonplace, shared by all”. So this is where the familiar term ‘common lilac’ comes from.  The variety name, ‘Krasavitsa Moscovy’ translates from the Russian to ‘Beauty of Moscow’ or ‘Pride of Moscow’ and refers to the fact it was hybridized in Russia. It dates to 1943. 

A beautiful and very fragrant variety, it has pale pink buds that open to form double white florets, blushed pink at the edges. The flowers are up to 9” long. It is stunning in full bloom. It matures over time to 8’-12’ tall by 6’-7’ wide. Like all common lilacs, it can be pruned immediately after flowering to contain its size.  

Syringa vulgaris ‘Ludwig Spaeth’ 

Lilac ‘French Ludwig Spaeth’

‘Ludwig Spaeth’ offers a display of beautiful, heavily fragrant, dark purple blooms that open from elegant violet flower buds. The flower clusters are up to 12” long. The foliage is bluish-green in color and heart shaped. Useful in the mixed border or in mass plantings, it will grow 8’-10’ in height and 6’-8’ in width.  

Syringa vulgaris ‘Madame Lemoine’ 

‘Madame Lemoine’ is an heirloom French lilac that has dense panicles of marvelously fragrant, double white flowers that open from creamy-white buds. The foliage is heart shaped in form and medium green in color. It grows up to 15’ in height and 12’ in width. This variety was hybridized by the famed French horticulturalist, Victor Lemoine, and named for his wife.  

Syringa vulgaris ‘Monge’ 

Lilac ‘Monge’

Another of Victor Lemoine’s introductions, ‘Monge’ has a depth of color that is striking. The flowers are deep reddish purple and richly fragrant. The flower panicles are up to 9” long and produced in abundance. It’s a dramatic and beautiful sight in the garden. A few branches cut for the house will fill the room with an enchanting fragrance. ‘Monge’ typically matures over time to a height of 8’-12’ and a similar width.  

Syringa vulgaris ’Sensation’ 

‘Sensation’ is unusual in that its flowers are bi-colored. The clusters of blooms are composed of individual purple flowers, each edged in white. They are sweetly fragrant. The effect is charming. Rich green foliage is held on upright branches. In time it reaches a height of 10’-12’ and a width of 6’. ‘Sensation’ will be a sensation in your garden.  

 

Reblooming Lilacs 

In recent years plant breeders have developed lilacs with the ability to rebloom. After the first flush of springtime bloom, these lilacs take a rest in the heat of summer before flowering again later in the summer and into the fall. The second bloom cycle is not as heavy as the first, but it is still showy. Pruning immediately after the spring bloom will create a fuller shrub with more branches and encourage more flowers. These lilacs display good mildew resistance. Their compact size allows them to fit into smaller landscapes and they make a nice addition to perennial beds, mixed borders and foundation plantings.  The Bloomerang series have large and fragrant flower clusters displayed on a dense and branching shrub which is perfectly sized for the small garden. 

Syringa x ‘Bloomerang Purple’ 

Clusters of lilac purple, sweetly scented flowers cover the branches in spring and continue off and on until frost. It grows 4’-5’ in height and width, making it suitable for small spaces. It is a nice addition to the mixed border and can be used to create a fragrant, low hedge. 

Syringa x ‘Bloomerang Dark Purple’ 

‘Bloomerang Dark Purple’ is slightly larger than others in the series, reaching 6’ in height and width. Its flower clusters are larger and more rounded in form. It has striking deep purple buds which open to classic deep lavender purple flowers. 

Syringa x  Bloomerang Pink Perfume’ 

This latest addition to the Bloomerang series has the same multi-season flower show, only this time in pink. Its dainty spikes of reddish purple buds open to fragrant, soft pink flowers in May. After the first heavy flush of flowers, it takes a short rest, flowering again intermittently until fall. Compact and rounded in shape, it grows 4’-5’ tall and wide. 

Syringa x hyacinthiflora  

Varieties of Syringa x hyacinthiflora are early blooming lilacs, often flowering up to 2 weeks before Syringa vulgaris varieties. They are known for their exceptional fragrance. They were developed as crosses between the common lilac, Syringa vulgaris, and the hardy northern Chinese native, Syringa oblata.  

Syringa x hyacinthiflora ‘Angel White’ 

‘White Angel’ has spectacular clusters of fragrant pure white flowers. It has an open-branched, upright form which makes a great hedge, screen or accent plant. It reaches a height of 12’ and a width of 10’. 

Syringa x hyacinthiflora ‘Declaration’  

Introduced by the U.S. National Arboretum, this outstanding cultivar has large, dramatic clusters of deep reddish-purple blooms that can be 8”-12” in length. It has the wonderful fragrance of the hyacinthiflora hybrids. Maturing at 6’-8’ tall and 5’-6’ wide, it is smaller than traditional lilacs, making it perfect for growing near a patio or in a mixed bed. 

Syringa x hyacinthiflora ‘Mount Baker’ 

Lilac ‘Mount Baker’

‘Mt. Baker’ has intensely fragrant white blossoms in spring. Growing 10’-12’ high and wide, it retains branches close to the ground, giving it a full appearance. The foliage has strong resistance to mildew and remains attractive over a long season.  

Syringa x hyacinthiflora ‘Pocahontas’ 

Lilac ‘Pocahontas’

A profuse and early bloomer, ‘Pocahontas’ features deep violet purple buds that open to fragrant, rich violet flowers. It is an upright and multi-stemmed plant that reaches 10’ tall and wide. The spring and summer foliage is a rich deep green that takes on bronzy red tones in the fall.  

Syringa x hyacinthiflora ‘Purple Glory’ 

‘Purple Glory’ has luxuriant deep purple flowers that are wonderfully fragrant. There is a heavy bloom set even on young plants. New leaves will emerge in spring with a purple blue blush, and in fall these purple highlights return. Dense foliage fills branches low to the ground. Growing 12’ tall and 8’ wide, it makes an attractive specimen plant and can also be massed in a hedge or screen. 

Syringa x ‘Tinkerbelle’ 

‘Tinkerbelle’ is a cross between 3 types of lilac, creating a compact, upright shrub that typically grows 4’-6’ tall and wide. It has lovely wine-colored buds that open to large, sweetly fragrant, pale pink flowers.